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The Art of Deception shows how vulnerable we all are - government, business, download hacker tools to break into computer systems; they're called script. The Art of Deception shows how vulnerable we all are - government, business technology, but simply download hacker tools to break into computer systems. The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security [Kevin D. Mitnick, books are available for instant access. view Kindle eBook | view Audible audiobook .. Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.


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Editorial Reviews. tetraedge.info Review. The Art of Deception is about gaining someone's trust Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Business & Money. The Art of Deception (eBook, ePUB) - Mitnick, Kevin D.;. Als Download Als Download kaufen. Bisher 31,99** Sofort per Download lieferbar. Abo Download. The Art of Deception book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of.

Los casos son realmente entretenidos de leer. Mi nota: Muy interesante. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

The Art of Intrusion is far more interesting, and I recommend it over this book without reservation. There is value for businesspeople to read this book, but I imagine it will present a significant challenge to their patience.

As an aside, Mitnick offers terrible advice regarding passwords. He argues that passwords should not consist of a constant combined with a predictable variable, such as "kevin01", "kevin02", "kevin03". I agree. He also says that users should not write down their passwords and tape the paper to their monitor or under their keyboards.

I agree again. He also, unfortunately, argues that passwords should expire every month. Well, that's terrible advice. Passwords need to be something people can remember, or they have to write them down. If they are going to be memorable, they can't change constantly. If they change constantly and must still be memorable, people have no choice but to add some predictable pattern to a memorable portion of a password.

In short, of options A Don't write passwords down B Don't use a simple increment in a password C Change passwords monthly, security administrators can pick any two. To try for all three is delusion.

View all 3 comments. Jan 27, Pramod Nair rated it really liked it Shelves: Now people hire me to do the same things I went to prison for, but in a legal and beneficial way. Mitnick, Ghost in the Wires: Kevin D. Mitnick , one of the legendary cyber desperado turned computer security consultant, takes the reader into the complex, supremely confident — often misunderstood as arrogance and curiosity driven mindset of the hacker world as he describes the human element of computer security.

The art of Deception shows how vulnerable we all are — government, business, and each of us personally — to the intrusions of the social engineer. In this security-conscious era, we spend huge sums on technology to protect our computer networks and data. This book points out how easy it is to trick insiders and circumvent all this technological protection. Mitnick covers almost all possible basic attack scenarios, which a real-life attacker uses in conning an unsuspecting computer user for gaining entry into a closed network.

By attacking the weakest link in the security apparatus, this book shows how a skilled social engineer can take complete control of a system by pulling the strings on an unsuspecting victim like a master puppeteer and making him do things which favors the attacker.

After showing each scenario, Mitnick explains the various factors, which made each scenario work, and gives valuable inputs and strategies on how organizations can prevent each scenario from happening with in their working environment.

Some readers may find the style of writing employed in the book not up to the mark, but as a practical book on analyzing and getting aware of the threat of Social Engineering and as an Information Security Policy reference this book has some valuable content.

In the present time you may find more detailed books on Social Engineering, but when this book came out in , it had some sensational content which I still remember reading with great thrill.

Some of the technical exploits related to the telephone systems that are mentioned in the book are a bit outdated but the methods and philosophy of exploits that target the human mind is very relevant even today. This book is a recommended read for anyone who is interested in computer security and the hacker subculture. Nov 09, Atila Iamarino rated it liked it Shelves: Um bom livro sobre aquele hacking moleque, aquele hacking arte, que era muito praticado antigamente.

Dec 22, Derek rated it liked it. I suspect that if you're reading for entertainment, then you probably want Mitnick's The Art of Intrusion or Ghost in the Wires instead. The guide, like all such specifications, is deadly dry and would require several readings and much thought to fully internalize. The anecdotes are more interesting than entertaining, and all proceed by the same b I suspect that if you're reading for entertainment, then you probably want Mitnick's The Art of Intrusion or Ghost in the Wires instead.

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The anecdotes are more interesting than entertaining, and all proceed by the same basic pattern: Sections directly relating to computer penetration are substantially less interesting than those that are merely two people on a phone. Mitnick's focus is organizational, not individual, and presupposes an organized, collective effort towards protection based on establishing correct procedure, education, and most of all the directed effort of those in charge.

As such I can't help but think that this book is targeted to executives and not to the peon-types on the front lines, who in the anecdotes are the ones who inadvertently give away the keys to the kingdom. Aug 26, John rated it really liked it Shelves: We think of computer hackers as sitting in an isolated room, endlessly probing corporate and private networks from their screen.

Actually, almost all deep hacking starts with the manipulation of people to do something that allows the hacker to move to the next level. The Art of Deception tells how Mitnick used "social engineering" skills to get people to unknowingly provide critical assistance, from simply being polite and opening a secure door to setting up restricted user accounts. Having read We think of computer hackers as sitting in an isolated room, endlessly probing corporate and private networks from their screen.

Having read this book, I am much more suspicious of any request made online, by phone, or in person by a stranger. Should be required reading for anyone in IT, especially those involved in network security. Das Telefon in der Buchhandlung klingelt.

Du, hier ist etwas ziemlich schief gelaufen und der Kunde tobt. Er hat auch schon bezahlt und braucht es dringend jetzt. Er holt es gleich ab. Gib es ihm einfach mit, ok? Und das einfach, indem jemand danach gefragt hat.

Der Vater geht relativ lax mit seinen Kreditkartenangaben um. Innerhalb von 10 Minuten. Top, die Wette gilt. Alles, in dem er einfach danach gefragt hat. Also von Orten, an denen man mit einer hohen Anforderung an die Sicherheit rechnet. Auch ich habe schon arglos Informationen weitergegeben. Dies wird nun nicht mehr vorkommen. Niemand geht davon aus, dass der freundliche Herr am Telefon, der so sehr in der Misere steckt, gar nicht der ist, der er zu sein scheint.

Es geht dabei nicht um Informationen wie "wo finde ich die Post? Vorsicht ist geboten! Etwas herunterladen? Lieber erst vergewissern, dass man wirklich mit jemandem aus der IT spricht!

Oct 26, James rated it liked it. Interesting read. Social engineering has been going on a long time and has impacted many corporations, governments, etc. I felt this book did a great job documenting examples of what has taken place as well as provided insights for what you and your organization can do to help prevent, the best that you can, social engineering attacks.

This book definitely irritated me as I had not thought about the detailed level of attacks folks have gone through. Thinking back, there have probably been So Thinking back, there have probably been some times where I had been the person on the receiving end.

Wish I had read this about a decade ago as it has some good common sense knowledge to learn from. Apr 08, Gwanderson rated it really liked it. Human's are like bad Microsoft coding.

Mar 04, Remo rated it really liked it Shelves: Jun 22, Khalid rated it liked it Shelves: Social Engineering. Social engineering is the term used in computer security to describe the manipulation of humans in order to break through a security barrier, and is sometimes referred to as hacking the mind.

Sammy Keyes and the Art of Deception

In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn't published with the final version of the book , Kevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least In The Art of Deception , [Kevin Mitnick] discusses the thing he's best at: In the first chapter of his book, usually referred to as The Lost Chapter As it wasn't published with the final version of the book , Kevin Mitnick tries to convince his readers that he is innocent — or at least that he isn't a "criminal".

I believe he made good points in this chapter, and wish it was published. The book isn't about Mitnick, though; it's about social engineering. If he was ever on the dark side, he is no longer there. He now works as a security consultant, and this book is designed to help improve security awareness, and help us all avoid being deceived by social engineers.

The bulk of this book consists of different stories of social engineers getting their job done, followed by advice on how to avoid such kinds of attacks. Just like any security book, this book can also help the bad guys improve their skills, because it offers many ideas on how you can trick people; however, if the good guys read the book, they would laugh at the bad guys' attempts and say "Ha, I know that one!

The idea of the book is very interesting, and some of its stories are really smart; however, I must admit that it gets a bit repetitive towards the end. The authors are trying to separate different stories into different chapters, but the differences between the ideas in these stories are sometimes so small. The ideas represented in this book are applicable to more than just computer-related systems Hey, you don't have to use them to steal money, but they're good to know anyway!

But anyway, as long as you use a computer, you'll most likely be fine reading it! The authors have just completed a new book, The Art of Intrusion. It looks like it is going to be more technical, and more geared toward hacking than social engineering.

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I probably will give it a try sometime. Jan 31, Koen Crolla rated it liked it Shelves: Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn't find a publisher for them.

That every story reads like a bad and I mean bad noir film isn't just annoying; it makes them much less credible. It's clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occa Almost all of this book consists of infinitesimal variations on the same point, communicated through accounts of apparently real events fictionalised by someone who clearly desperately wanted to write short stories instead of ghost-writing for minor celebrities but couldn't find a publisher for them.

It's clear that Mitnick thinks very highly of himself and his accomplishments, occasionally remembering to point out that it's really easy to defend against social engineering attacks but mostly painting social engineers as omnipotent Supermen who are just better than the common folk who merely work in offices; he also seems to think he's the first person to write a book about defending against these con men, judging by his two chapters of condescending policy recommendations.

Sammy Keyes and the Art of Deception by Wendelin Van Draanen | tetraedge.info: Books

Maybe he is, to a lot of the people who'd read this book. It's certainly likely that The Art of Deception has done and will continue to do more good than harm, which is more than can be said for most popular books on any kind of security.

That doesn't make it any less repetitive, though. Jan 22, Son Tung rated it really liked it. Mitnick - a former hacker turned security expert - gives an excellent view on security threats posed by human factor in modern world. The common sense that computer geeks are often fat, unpopular with heavy glasses and nerdy faces is not applicable in "Social Engineer" category. Social engineer is someone with talent and understanding for both social behavior and technical command.

The funny parts are, sometimes the job can be done by curious individuals or dumpster scavengers. Imagine the work done by industrial spies to create heavy impact spionage! You will find dialogs which so amazingly similar with those in heist movies. Yep, it is real and complex. It was an enjoyable read for me, some parts are repetitive, i felt like a voice of an old, experienced man keeps echoing: Its all about human, not about fancy technology or machine.

View 1 comment. Mar 01, G.

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Lupo rated it really liked it. Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt.

Following his capture and time in prison, he's become an Internet security consultant and turned his talents to helping people avoid the sort of hacks he became famous for perpetrating. This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have be Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt.

This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have been carried out by Mitnick himself and recommendations for how to guard against such attacks.

I actually recognize a number of the policies he recommends as being part of the security awareness my company conducts every year for employees, so apparently, someone listened. I must admit I found the anecdotes more interesting than the policy recommendations, though someone tasked with guarding his or her companies assets would no doubt find these of immense value.

Definitely worth a read.

Mar 29, Russell rated it liked it. I found the most valuable sections in this book to be the policy recommendations and information security practices described in the last chapters despite their age.

I'll probably buy this book simply because of the security policy information and the easy-to-understand business cases that are easily comprehendible due to their storylike nature. Feb 24, Ayaan rated it really liked it Shelves: Zzzzzzzzzz, Oh sorry This was a tough read. Very dry and if you've ever worked in a corporate environment, or IT at all, most of this is simply common sense. Some of the 'examples' used are repeated in Kevin's other book, Ghost in the Wires, which I read before this one.

GitW is a good read, this one, not so much Jul 07, Stefan rated it it was ok. While the book demonstrates the basic concept of social engineering quite well, it would never have got so much attention if Mitnick's name wasn't on the cover. It's okay, but it's not extraordinary.

Nov 01, James rated it liked it. This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time. As a nerdy kid growing up I was fascinated by computers and the then-emerging Internet. I remember stumbling onto the "Anarchist Cookbook", and finding a few issues of the hacker magazine at a Barnes and Noble. The checkout lady gave me a concerned frown and told me to be careful. Haha, joke was on her! I had no idea what I was reading. Except for the parts about Kevin Mitnick, This one had been sitting on my shelf for a loooong time.

Except for the parts about Kevin Mitnick, the world's greatest hacker. There was apparently some big "Free Kevin! Except he never hurt anyone or truly damaged or broke anything, he just got caught having fun digitally trespassing. The day came when he was finally released from prison, and I remember gleefully watching him on ZNet TV on an episode of the Screensaver's being allowed to access the Internet for the first time. This was the ultimate "We did it Reddit! When I recently had to take an online training class at work about social engineers trying to trick you into giving up valuable proprietary information, there were cute little video segments featuring my old friend Kevin.

Holy crap! That guy! My old hero! I changed my AIM status to support you! Oh wait, I bought your first book when it came out and I never read it! Let's do this! I regret that I did not read it then. While a lot of the information it provides is still quite valuable and true, it's almost commonplace in any workplace setting these days.

That's not to say social engineers have given up and hung up their hats, it's likely more prevalent than ever, but this is the Social Engineering book for people taking the on-ramp to the Information Superhighway for the very first time in the early s. It features advice in there like don't keep your passwords written down next to locked computers there are a few X-Files episodes where Mulder and Scully can be thankful the monsters they were investigating didn't read this book , make those passwords a little more secure by being longer than 8 characters, don't let someone convince you to attach a dial-up modem to your computer or network, and don't set your modem to auto-answer lest a bored Matthew Broderick finds it.

The main point behind this book is still very true today: It doesn't matter how sophisticated your technologically amazing security systems are, gullible super-friendly happy-to-help human beings are always your weakest link.

I'm convinced that if the Chinese have any engineering blueprints of our latest warfighters, they probably got it from having a young-looking spy with a goofy grin pretend to need help writing a book report. But it's less embarrassing to blame faceless hackers. The best parts of the book were the little story vignettes that demonstrated how a person can make a few seemingly innocent phone calls asking for tidbits of information that lead to the mother-load.

The first call could be person pretending to be a customer needing some advice. The next phone call could be to the receptionist with that little bit of gained knowledge to sound like an employee at another location. That receptionist will provide information that a manager could use, and suddenly Gary in accounting needs to send over the latest financial projections STAT. The Gathering. Michael Carroll. Gods of Manhattan.

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